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Eric Clapton's Six-String Stories Now on View at Rock Hall Library and Archives

Monday, March 31: 1:45 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Eric Clapton / photo by Brad LeMee for Genesis Publications' "Six-string Stories"

In honor of the 69th birthday of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Eric Clapton, the Rock Hall’s Library and Archives is pleased to feature Clapton’s beautiful new limited edition book Six-String Stories: The Crossroads Guitars in its main reading room.

“One by one these guitars were the chapters of my life,” says Clapton about the book. Personally signed by Clapton himself, the 376-page volume documents his entire career through the tools of his trade: his guitars. Six-String Stories is told through Clapton's own words, with background information for each instrument and archival photography spanning five decades.

Eric Clapton autograph Genesis Publications book“As an avid rock or blues fan I would look at all the pictures in this book,” says Clapton. Nearly 300 pieces from Clapton's collection, sold across three Crossroads auctions, are brought together here for the very first time. Six-String Stories presents a “family tree,” making connections between Clapton's instruments and amps, and placing them in the chronology of his career.

“These guitars have been really good tools,” says Clapton. “They're not just museum pieces. They all have a soul, and they all come alive.” Every piece has been photographed, showing the beauty of the design ...


continue Categories: Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Hall of Fame, Exclusive Interviews, Library and Archives

Finding The Pied Piper of Cleveland

Monday, March 19: 4:30 p.m.
Posted by Chris Kennedy
Bill Haley and Elvis Presley

On Thursday, October 20, 1955, at approximately 1:45 pm, 20-year-old Elvis Presley’s rebel yell of “Wellll, I heard the news, there’s good rockin’ tonight!” smacked off the auditorium walls of Brooklyn (Ohio) High School, as cameras from Universal – International Pictures filmed, in color, the flashpoint of the birth of rock and roll.

This unseen footage, know today as The Pied Piper of Cleveland, remains the lost, Holy Grail of rock and roll. But not necessarily because of Presley’s performance, one of his first out of the South, which by most eyewitness accounts wasn’t so spectacularly mind-blowing, or by the appearances of the other, more established acts on the bill. The Pied Piper of Cleveland retains its mystery and allure simply because it has eluded capture for so many years, and because its producer and star, Cleveland top jock Bill Randle, made sure never to answer questions about the film's fate candidly, never letting its tantalizing specter fade from the rock and roll consciousness. 

For the last eight years, I've dedicated a considerable amount of time peering through nearly 60 years of Randle's smoke and mirrors, attempting to discern exactly what transpired ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, Exclusive Interviews, Event

The Lost Photographs of Cleveland Deejay Tommy Edwards

Thursday, January 12: 4 p.m.
Posted by Terry Stewart
Tommy Edwards (center) with the Everly Brothers

Many know that rock and roll was christened in Cleveland, Ohio, when DJ Alan Freed coined the phrase to describe the up-tempo R&B music he was beaming out on his popular radio show. Freed opened the doors for countless artists, and for years was the de facto king of rock and roll. But fewer know about the cadre of revolutionary Cleveland disc jockeys who shared the airwaves with Freed. Among them was Tommy Edwards. 

Edwards, who owned a prominent record store, pressed records and was a disc jockey at WERE 1300 AM, was instrumental in bringing Elvis Presley to Cleveland in 1955 for his first performance north of the Mason-Dixon line. Pat Boone headlined the concert, and the supporting bill included Bill Haley and the Comets, the Four Lads, Priscilla Wright and a largely unknown Presley. It was there that Edwards snapped the famous photograph of Presley with Haley, one of the few times the two met. The show was not held in a grand concert hall or big-ticket venue, but in a suburb of Cleveland at Brooklyn High School. The now mythical performance is rumored to have been captured in vivid Technicolor, and dubbed The Pied Piper ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit
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