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srvTK

Saturday, April 18: 12:01 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Double Trouble Rip Through "Pride and Joy" with Jimmie Vaughan, John Mayer, Gary Clark Jr and Doyle Bramhall

 

[john mayer quote]

 

A who's who of axe slingers took the stage with the original members of Double Trouble to deliver blistering versions of three Stevie Ray Vaughan tracks: "Pride and Joy," "Texas Flood" and "Six Strings Down." 

The set kicked off with "Pride and Joy," as John Mayer, Gary Clark Jr., Doyle Bramhall and Stevie's brother Jimmie Vaughan traded licks on the blues-rock classic.

[jimmie vaughan quote]

Texas blues received a jolt of energy from 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble. The Austin-based group already had a considerable following when the legendary John Hammond produced Texas Flood, their debut album. "Pride And Joy" received substantial airplay on album rock-radio. 

From its screeching guitar opening through a steely mid-section solo and on to the concluding guitar passage, "Pride And Joy" declared Stevie Ray Vaughan the first Texas blues-rock guitar god since Johnny Winter's late 60s heyday. He would go on to help foster a blues revival in the mid-Eighties. Tonight's one-off performance was a testament to that enduring legeacy.

Experience ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, History of the Blues, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Event, Hall of Fame

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential "5" Royales Songs

Thursday, April 16: 5 p.m.
Posted by Jason Hanley

Over the course of two decades – from 1945 to 1965 – 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee the "5" Royales created a remarkable body of work that laid the foundation for a host of music that followed in its wake. With pivotal recordings and performing techniques that helped define a variety of styles under the rock and roll umbrella, the group is responsible for some of rock's first true standards. Here are my picks for essential listening.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee the 5 Royales songs


“Bedside of a Neighbor” (1952)
The very first record by the “5” Royales was a variation of the Thomas Dorsey tune “(Standing By the) Bedside of a Neighbor.” It was recorded in August of 1951 and released on Apollo Records in January of 1952 under the name The Royal Sons Quintet. They put in a great vocal performance with the lead sung by John Tanner, but don’t miss the gospel piano played by the group’s friend Royal Abbit.

“Baby Don’t Do It” (1952)
While their contract with Apollo was to record gospel music, the group quickly began recording secular music as well; at first under the name the Royals, and then by the time of this hit song ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble Songs

Thursday, April 16: 2 p.m.
Posted by Jason Hanley

The studio and live LPs released during the last seven years of 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Stevie Ray Vaughan's life ensured his place in Stratocaster immortality and influenced the next generation of blues guitarists. With Double Trouble bandmates Tommy Shannon on bass, Chris Layton on drums and Reese Wynans on keyboards, the Texas-born blues-rock powerhouse forged a sound that influenced and inspired countless players around the globe.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble

“Love Struck Baby”
The first song on the debut album from Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble, Texas Flood, released on June 13, 1983 – it was also the first single from the album. But don’t be fooled if it sounds too good to be a new band; Stevie Ray formed the band in 1978, and the final lineup had come together in 1980 consisting of SRV, Tommy Shannon (bass), and Chris Layton (drums).


“Pride and Joy”
This song is a great example of a Texas Shuffle (in which the guitar plays a triplet pattern over the quadruple meter of the band). Listen to how in the opening Stevie Ray plays all the off beats with an upstroke on the guitar to emphasize them. It makes for a great ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Jimi Hendrix, Hall of Fame

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Joan Jett and the Blackhearts Songs

Tuesday, April 14: 4 p.m.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Joan Jett and the Blackhearts created a potent mix of hard rock, glam, punk, metal and garage rock that sounds fresh and relevant in any era. The group's biggest hit, “I Love Rock ‘N’ Roll” (Number One in 1982) is a rock classic – a pure and simple a statement about the music’s power. The honesty and power of their records make you believe that rock and roll can change the world. Here are my picks for essential songs that do just that.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Joan Jett and the Blackhearts

“Do You Wanna Touch Me (Oh Yeah)”  
This song is a cover of glam rocker Gary Glitter’s 1973 hit, delivered with the authoritative punch as only Joan Jett and the Blackhearts can.


 

“I Love Rock ‘N Roll”
Joan Jett's version of this Arrows song was ranked Number 89 in the "100 Greatest Guitar Songs" by Rolling Stone magazine, and was Joan Jett and the Blackhearts first Number One.



Crimson and Clover
This reworking of the Tommy James and the Shondells classic reached Number Seven, wonderfully capturing the Jett and company's ability to do tender and tough will equal aplomb.

“I Love You Love Me Love ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Hall of Fame, History of Punk

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Paul Butterfield Blues Band Songs

Monday, April 13: 1 p.m.
Posted by Jason Hanley

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee The Paul Butterfield Blues Band took the world by storm at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival, expertly combining American rock and roll and the blues with Butterfield’s inspired harmonica and Mike Bloomfield’s explosive lead guitar. Their self-titled album released in 1965 and its follow-up, East-West in 1966, kicked open a door that brought a defining new edge to rock and roll. Here are my picks for essential Paul Butterfield Blues Band listening.

2105 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee the Paul Butterfield Blues Band
 

“Born in Chicago”
This is the opening song on their first album and immediately establishes the group as a part of long history of electric Chicago blues (in the tracks of Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf).  The song was written by friend and collaborator Nick Gravenites who would go on to pen many classic psychedelic blues tunes in the years to come.



“Our Love is Drifting”
A slow blues burner written by the band’s two guitarists Bloomfield and Bishop. While the solos are enough to knock your socks off don’t ignore the great melodic call and response between the vocal and the guitar in the verses.

“Work Song”
While “Work Song” was originally written and recorded ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, History of the Blues, Event, Hall of Fame

Finding Bill Withers and Making "Still Bill"

Friday, April 10: 5:16 p.m.
Posted by Alex Vlack

As part of the Rock Hall's Celebration Day, the Museum will screen the Bill Withers documentary, Still Bill, at 5pm ET. In this post, the film's co-director (along with Damani Baker) Alex Vlack, shares how he found Bill Withers, his hero, and transformed the experience into a movie.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Bill Withers

Everyone who's ever turned on the radio, walked into a restaurant, been in a bar, lived in this country for more than a few days knows Bill Withers' biggest songs. But most people don't know his name, and most people don't know most of his music.

I didn't really discover it until college, when my friend Jon Fine turned me on to Still Bill, Withers' second record. We listened to it on cassette over and over and over. I'd grown up on blues and jazz and rock, and thought I was pretty well-versed – when you're 18 years old, you can think of yourself as a lot of things! – so how could an album like this have slipped past me? It was, simply, the best album I'd ever heard. Fine and I started a band, and one of the first things we did was ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Event

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Bill Withers Songs

Thursday, April 9: 5:54 p.m.

TK


“Ain’t No Sunshine”
The song that set the framework for the Bill Withers sound with its sparse arrangement, direct,  no-frills lyric and in-the-pocket groove.
 
“Grandma’s Hands”
“I was one of those kids who was smaller than all the girls. I stuttered. I had asthma. So I had some issues," recalled Bill Withers. "My grandmother was that one person who would always say that I was going to be OK. … When you're a weaker kid, whoever champions you becomes very important to you."  
                                           
“Who Is He(and What is He to You?)”
Just the right undertone of menace and an unrelenting repeated funky riff drives   this testament of a jealous lover home. 
                          
“Lean on Me”
Bill Withers’ first Number One hit took us to church. "It's a rural song that translates across demographic lines,” Withers recalled. “My experience was, there were people who were that way. They would help you out. Even in the rural South, there were people who would help you out even across racial lines. Somebody who would probably stand in a mob that might lynch you if you pissed them off, would help you out in another way."
 
“I Can’t Write ...


continue Categories: Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, History of Rock and Roll, Exhibit, Inductee, Hall of Fame

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential "5" Royales Songs

Thursday, April 9: 5:21 p.m.

TK


“Baby Don’t Do It”
From the first rolling piano chords through the soaring vocals and swinging horn arrangement, this first “5” Royales appearance on the charts signals that they are here to rock and take no prisoners.

“Help Me Somebody”
Starting out as a gospel-tinged slow drag,  the “5” Royales throw a double-time curve into the bridge of this song, their second big hit.

“Monkey Hips and Rice”

This song dares you keep your seat, tugging you up to dance to its infectious beat and the compelling interplay between vocal and saxophone.
     
“When I Get Like This”

The matchless lead vocal on this song is simply stunning, transforming heartbreak and loss into a sonic masterpiece.

"Think"
This song embodies all of the soul and swagger of the “5” Royales in one catchy, finger-snapping hit, punctuated by Lowman Pauling’s masterful guitar work.

“Messin’ Up”
A decidedly exuberant romp that starts out in overdrive and never lets up for a moment – messin’ up was never more fun.

“Dedicated to the One I Love”
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees the Mamas and the Papas’ and the Shirelles’ versions of this song are put to shame by the “5 ...


continue Categories: Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, History of the Blues, History of Rock and Roll
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