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Dead & Company Raise Spirits on Night of Paris Attacks

Wednesday, November 18: 5:02 p.m.
Posted by Carl Harp

Dead & Co concert John Mayer November 13 2015 columbus ohio

Compassion, peace and a celebratory atmosphere have loyally followed the Grateful Dead for five decades, yet the reformed group's November 13, 2015 concert began on a somber note.
After taking the stage with his Dead & Company bandmates, grabbing his guitar and briefly warming his fingers, Bob Weir started the show with a eulogy: “So to begin, we have some bad news from Paris. And really I think the best thing we can do, all of us are doing, is remember, celebrate the lives of the 60 or so Parisian concertgoers who died today at the hands of religious extremists, who if they had their way, would outlaw music in all the world." He implored Deadheads to celebrate the lives of those who lost their lives in the Paris attacks "and the joy that they found in music.”

For the hours leading up to the Dead & Company tour stop at Columbus, Ohio’s Nationwide Arena, social media feeds and news reports were filled with the news unfolding across the globe; and with tragedy occurring at a concert, I could not help feel grief, slight paranoia and empathy.

Dead & Co concert John Mayer November 13 2015 columbus ohio

Following Weir’s dedication, he and the band (John Mayer on guitar and ...

continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, The Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, Hall of Fame, Rare Performances

Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll: "Born to Run"

Tuesday, August 25: 1:55 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall


Bruce Springsteen Born to Run handwritten lyrics Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland Ohio

In 1975, New Jersey native Bruce Springsteen was hailed as the new Dylan, the next great rock poet, the music's last prophet of social relevance. His picture graced the covers of Time and Newsweek (the same week, no less).By the time his third album, Born To Run, was released, Springsteen had added another archetype to the rock and roll pantheon: blue-collar hero, working-man's star. Born To Run's title track consolidated 25 years of rock and roll history into a universal tale of proletarian angst rendered larger than life by Spector-esque production.

Springsteen's protagonist does little more than motor down New Jersey's Highway 9 to flee small town drudgery. But to hear him tell it, he's headed down the road to glory. As the centerpiece of the hours-long sets that mark Springsteen's career, "Born To Run" provided uplift and catharsis, with the singer and foil/sax player Clarence Clemons engaging in joyous musical and physical interplay (captured in a live film clip that ranks with rock's most exhilarating concert footage).

On the surface, "Born To Run" may be little more than a song about cars and girls. Dig deeper, however, and rock ...

continue Categories: Inductee, Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll

The 50th Anniversary of the Beatles at Shea Stadium

Saturday, August 15: 3:47 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

On August 15, 1965, the Beatles performed before a crowd of more than 55,000 ecstatic fans in New York City’s Shea Stadium. That’s a lot of screaming.

The legendary performance was the first ever in a major U.S. stadium, and is known as perhaps the most famous Beatles’ concert – well, maybe that infamously cut short rooftop gig ranks higher.

The 1964 Ludwig drum kit played by Ringo Starr during that Shea Stadium gig was also used on six Beatles’ albums, as well as during their last official concert appearance in San Francisco’s Candlestick Park in 1966. Can you think of a more iconic drum set?

John Lennon’s 1964 Rickenbacker electric guitar used during the performance was one of two guitars made especially for Lennon while visiting America for the first time in 1964, and used on the Beatles second-ever Ed Sullivan appearance. It soon became his primary instrument, and still has the set list from Shea Stadium taped to the side.

Hard to believe that 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of that Beatles’ milestone – and that Beatlemania would still be alive and well! Both the Ringo Starr Ludwig drumkit and the John Lennon Rickenbacker ...

continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, Today in Rock, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, The Beatles, Inductee, Hall of Fame

Keith Richards Praises the Blues and Calls Sgt. Pepper's "Rubbish"

Wednesday, August 5: 3:40 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Keith Richards inducts Chuck Berry into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 1986 Induction Ceremony photo

Rolling Stones’ guitarist Keith Richards recently opened up about the genre he calls “the original music form in the world.”

“I recognize power when I see it,” Richards told Esquire magazine in an interview published in August 2015. “There's something incredibly powerful about the blues — the raw blues. There isn't a piece of popular music probably that you've heard that hasn't in some weird way been influenced by the blues.”

Richards also shared that he’s been lucky enough to meet and perform with all of his blues-based heroes. “All of these guys that I used to listen to – the amazing thing is that even at my age, I'm living in a place where I know all of my heroes, warts and all, and still love 'em,” said Richards. “Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis — man, if that is not 'Mr. Rock 'n' Roll,' I don't know who is. Little Richard; I love those cats.” Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis and Little Richard were all part of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's first class in 1986.

“It’s very difficult for me to talk about Chuck Berry, because I lifted every lick ...

continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of the Blues, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Event, The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Hall of Fame

The E Street Band's Nils Lofgren: "what Chuck Berry was to Keith Richards, Keith Richards is to me"

Tuesday, August 4: 5 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Interview with Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Nils Lofgren

During a recent tour stop in Cleveland, Ohio, we caught up with 2014 Hall of Fame Inductee, much-lauded solo artist, E Street Band guitarist and incredible storyteller Nils Lofgren who shared how he first became interested in playing the guitar, a faithful night seeing both the Who and Jimi Hendrix in concert, the influence of Keith Richards and the Rolling Stones, the Beatles; and the "god awful" music he and Bruce Springsteen made while backing Chuck Berry in Cleveland at the Rock Hall's opening concert.

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: Your first instrument as a child was the classical accordion. How did that come about? 

Nils Lofgren: Well, I spent eight years on the South Side of Chicago, where I was born. When I was five, every kid played accordion. I asked to take lessons, and I did. After the waltzes and polkas, you move in to classical or jazz. My teacher sent me in to classical accordion. It was an enormous musical study and backdrop, and, as a young teenager, I fell in love with the Beatles and Stones. Through them, I discovered the British invasion, the American counterpart of great rock bands in the 60s; Stax ...

continue Categories: Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Event, Jimi Hendrix, The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Exclusive Interviews

Brendon Urie of Panic! at the Disco talks Weezer, Springsteen, Journey, Nirvana and AP

Friday, July 24: 12:59 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Brendon Urie of Panic! At the Disco interivew APMAS Alternative Press Exhibit Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Cleveland, Ohio

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: Tell us about some of the artists, bands who really influenced you…

Brendon Urie: Weezer… huge influence on me. I learned to play drums to the blue album [Weezer]. When I got that… I took it from my sister; I just had the cassette, and I remember just popping it in my boom box (that was still a thing, kids) and… I would just put on my really shitty headphones, and just kind of try to like… I had to tape them up, just so that they didn’t move, and just playing along for six hours. I would just listen to that album constantly. So, I mean every one of those songs… I wanted to start surfing, because of [“Surf Wax America”]… I wanted to live how they were describing their songs… how Rivers was, you know… and then later I would learn like, he’s this English major, went to college for literature and stuff… just a super smart guy. So, everything he’s singing about is a personal experience that’s true, and that really, truly affected me and songwriting as I got older. I wanted to do that, I wanted ...

continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Exclusive Interviews

The Ultimate 4th of July Playlist (and Most Misinterpreted Songs)

Thursday, July 2: 3:21 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall


With the patriotic pageantry, fireworks, barbecues and neighborhood gatherings that come with the 4th of July just around the corner, Rock Hall staff crafted the ultimate playlist as the soundtrack to all things Americana and celebrations of summertime fun.

The 50-song list covers a lot of musical territory, from 50s to today, blues, pop, punk, R&B, jazz and some classic rockers, of course. Inductees feature prominently – Alice Cooper, Sly and the Family Stone, Young Rascals, Bob Marley, Janis Joplin, Martha Reeves and the Vandellas, the Ramones, among many others – but so do other artists who've made their mark with sunny revelations: Kool and the Gang, Chicago, the Undertones, the Surfaris, Lovin' Spoonful, Billy Idol, Afrojack and, yes, Katy Perry.
Get the Rock Hall's Ultimate 4th of July playlist via Spotify.
In the meantime, here are  three tracks that are so routinely misinterpreted – and we included some deliberately in our list! – we just had to give the backstory.

Bruce Springsteen – "Born in the USA"

Arguably the most misappropriated song in rock and roll history, "Born in the USA" has been the anthemic backdrop to countless episodes of fist-pumping demonstrations. Anti-Muslim protestors chanted the chorus while picketing the site ...

continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble Songs

Thursday, April 16: 2 p.m.
Posted by Jason Hanley

The studio and live LPs released during the last seven years of 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Stevie Ray Vaughan's life ensured his place in Stratocaster immortality and influenced the next generation of blues guitarists. With Double Trouble bandmates Tommy Shannon on bass, Chris Layton on drums and Reese Wynans on keyboards, the Texas-born blues-rock powerhouse forged a sound that influenced and inspired countless players around the globe.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble

“Love Struck Baby”
The first song on the debut album from Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble, Texas Flood, released on June 13, 1983 – it was also the first single from the album. But don’t be fooled if it sounds too good to be a new band; Stevie Ray formed the band in 1978, and the final lineup had come together in 1980 consisting of SRV, Tommy Shannon (bass), and Chris Layton (drums).

“Pride and Joy”
This song is a great example of a Texas Shuffle (in which the guitar plays a triplet pattern over the quadruple meter of the band). Listen to how in the opening Stevie Ray plays all the off beats with an upstroke on the guitar to emphasize them. It makes for a great ...

continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Jimi Hendrix, Hall of Fame
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