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Billie Joe Armstrong and Norah Jones Pay Tribute to the Everly Brothers on "Foreverly"

Tuesday, November 19: 5 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
The Everly Brothers circa 1958

The Everly Brothers' sound borrowed from Appalachian folk, bluegrass and country to form a dreamy, innocent style of rock and roll. Over the decades – particuarly in the Fifties and Sixties – the Everlys’ close-harmony style influenced the likes of the Hollies, Simon and Garfunkel, the Byrds and the Beatles, with Paul McCartney noting “They were and still are the very best.” Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in its inaugural year, 1986, the Everly Brothers are featured in the Museum's Cities and Sounds exhibit, in the Rave On section. There, visitors to the Museum will find the outfits worn by the brothers on the cover of The Fabulous Style of the Everly Brothers, as well as a 1963 Gibson Everly Brothers model featuring a split pick guard surrounding the sound hole that was meant to represent the brothers’ familial resemblance.

Watch + Listen: Billie Joe Armstrong and Norah Jones "Silver Haired Daddy of Mine"

While best-known for such hits as "Cathy's Clown," "Bye Bye Love,""Wake Up Little Susie," and "All I Have to Do Is Dream," in 1958, Don and Phil Everly surprised fans when they shifted tack, paying homage to their Tennessee roots. On Songs ...


continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, The Beatles, Inductee, Hall of Fame

Interview with Bill Janovitz, author of "Rocks Off: 50 Tracks That Tell the Story of the Rolling Stones"

Tuesday, October 22: 4 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Tonight, Bill Janovitz will discuss his recent book Rocks Off: 50 Tracks That Tell the Story of The Rolling Stones at Cuyahoga Community College’s Tommy LiPuma Center for Creative Arts in the Black Box Theater (adjacent to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s Library and Archives, 2809 Woodland Avenue, Cleveland). The event is part of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's 18th annual Music Masters series, honoring the music of the Rolling Stones. For the complete schedule of Music Masters events, including Saturday's Rolling Stones tribute concert, click here.

In Rocks Off, Janovitz – also singer, guitarist, and songwriter in the band Buffalo Tom – shares the story of the Rolling Stones as told through 50 of their most representative songs. Janovitz is also the author of Exile on Main Street (from the critically acclaimed 33 1/3 series) about the iconic Stones album. 

In advance of tonight's event, Janovitz toured the Museum in Cleveland, including Rolling Stones: 50 Years of Satisfaction. He sat down with the Rock Hall to discuss how he came up with Rocks Off concept, how he narrowed down the Rolling Stones' catalog to just 50 songs and why ...


continue Categories: Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, Event, Rolling Stones, Hall of Fame, American Music Masters, Education, Exclusive Interviews

10 Things You Might Not Have Known About The Rolling Stones' "Sticky Fingers"

Wednesday, October 9: 5 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

The fans voted, and we listened: the Rolling Stones album to be highlighted during tonight's special listening party in the Museum's Foster Theater will be the group's 1971 classic recording Sticky Fingers. After asking fans to decide what Rolling Stones album the Rock Hall should highlight, the votes were tallied and Sticky Fingers rose to the top. Tonight, visitors can listen to the entire album through the Museum's state-of-the-art Foster Theater sound system and take part in an in-depth look at the record led by the Rock Hall's education department. Tune in to the live stream at 8 pm EST here! The Rock Hall will honor the Rolling Stones as the 2013 Music Masters during the week of October 21

Released in 1971, Sticky Fingers captured the sound of the Rolling Stones' inimitable, insouciant style. The album was released less than a year after the group launched its own record label – aptly named Rolling Stones Records – for which they signed a distribution deal with Atlantic Records. The initial releases on the new label were Sticky Fingers and its raunchy, rocking first single, “Brown Sugar.” Musically, the album showcased the band's versatility, from the country ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Event, Rolling Stones, Hall of Fame, Education, Foster Theatre, Rock and Roll Night School

Johnny Cash Now on Stamp and Exhibit

Wednesday, June 5: 4:20 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
The United States Postal Service's new Johnny Cash stamp.

Today, the United States Postal Service officially made available a new Johnny Cash stamp, honoring the American music legend and 1992 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee as part of the Postal Service's Music Icons series. The stamp features a portrait of Cash taken by famed photographer Frank Bez, who captured the image of  "the Man in Black" during photo sessions for 1963's Ring of Fire: The Best of Johnny Cash

Although present at the genesis of rock and roll as one of the earliest signings to Sam Phillips' Sun Records in 1955, Cash recorded for nearly three decades with Columbia Records, a fruitful period that produced an estimated 1,400 songs. Cash's 16th album, Ring of Fire did, in fact, feature some of his best material, and on the week of January 11, 1964, it became the Number One album on Billboard's new Country Album chart. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's collection features a number of Johnny Cash items in the Memphis section of the Museum's Cities and Sounds exhibit. Among the featured items are a suit worn by Cash and a 1943 Martin acoustic guitar he played ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit

At the Library and Archives: Roy Orbison’s Final Interview

Friday, May 31: 12 p.m.
Posted by Andy Leach
Roy Orbison's last performance on December 4, 1988 / photo by Janet Macoska

For the past year and a half, the staff of the Rock Hall’s Library and Archives has been working to digitally preserve and catalog thousands of hours of footage of performances, interviews, education programs, oral histories and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremonies that have taken place over the past few decades. Making this footage and other resources available to researchers and music fans for the first time is one of the things that already makes our jobs exciting, but one recent donation really captured my interest.

It was the original VHS cassette containing the very last interview with Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Roy Orbison ever recorded. The interview was done at the Front Row Theater in Highland Heights, Ohio, after Orbison’s final show on December 4, 1988, and this was the tape that was there in the room while the interview took place. It was recently donated by Tony Weber, who conducted the interview for his public access television show that ran from 1987 to 1989. Some low-quality dubs of the footage (likely captured from the television broadcast) can be seen on YouTube, but this is the original tape, so it is ...


continue Categories: American Music Masters, Hall of Fame, Inductee, Library and Archives, Exclusive Interviews

50 Years Later: The Legacy of Patsy Cline

Tuesday, March 5: 11:30 a.m.
Posted by Shelby Morrison
Patsy Cline "Walkin' After Midnight"/"A Poor Man's Roses" 1961 single, on exhibit at the Rock Hall

Best known for her bold, rich and unparalleled emotionally expressive voice, Patsy Cline is one of the most inspirational, influential and impactful female vocalists of the 20th century. As a country music industry pioneer, Cline helped to blaze a trail for women to become headline performers in the genre. As a pillar of talent, Cline often encouraged and helped to support a number of female artists in country music, including Loretta Lynn, Barbara Mandrell, Brenda Lee and Dottie West. Cline also befriended her male counterparts, including Roger Miller, Faron Young, Harlan Howard and Carl Perkins – possessing the rare ability to be “one of the boys.” Cline could belly-up to the bar and tell a raunchier joke than any man. Her moxie and spunky attitude garnered the respect of the “good ole’ boy” Nashville network and allowed her to take charge of her own career in a way that other women at the time simply couldn’t do. Cline never backed down when it came to the business – “No dough, no show” was often her mantra and according to friend and fellow perfomer West, “It was common knowledge around town that you didn’t mess with ‘The Cline!’” 


continue Categories: Exhibit, Today in Rock

Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll: "That's All Right"

Monday, January 7: 5 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Elvis Presley's That's All Right is one of the Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll

Tuesday, January 8, 2013 would have been Elvis Presley's 78th birthday. Presley was among the first ever inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1986, an honor befitting his standing as the undisputed King of Rock and Roll. Presely rose from humble beginnings to launch a musical revolution, helping guide the trajectory of the rock and roll genre for deacades. But is "That's All Right" where the legend of Elvis began? What's certain is that "That's All Right" was Elvis Presley's first commercially released recording. He had previously made two private recordings, whose four songs give absolutely no hint of what was to come. Neither did two additional songs Presley tried before "That's All Right" during a faithful July 5, 1954, recording session. That Presley was recording at all is a tribute to Sam Phillips. Phillips' Memphis Recording Service was where Presley had cut his private acetate records and where he would sometimes hang out, trying to find an opening in the music business. Phillips contacted Presley after receiving a song demo he thought might suit the shy teenager. It didn't, but Phillips persevered. He called for the July 5 ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll, Event

Video: Elvis Presley Exhibit at the Rock Hall

Monday, January 7: 4 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Elvis Presley's "King of Spades" jumpsuit is among the items in the Rock Hall's Elvis exhibit

In 1974, Elvis Presley returned to his adopted hometown and the city that gave him his start: Memphis, Tennessee. More than two decades after his first recordings at Sam Phillips' Memphis Recording Service, Presley performed five sold-out shows, the fifth and last of which was recorded and released as Elvis Recorded Live on Stage in Memphis by RCA. In this video, curatorial director Howard Kramer shares the stories behind some of the artifacts in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's Elvis Presley exhibit in Cleveland, Ohio, including the "King of Spades" jumpsuit Presley wore and the handwritten setlist he penned for that memorable performance.

To learn more, visit the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum on Tuesday, January 8, 2013 – what would've been Elvis Presley's 78th birthday – when curatorial director Howard Kramer will lead a special "Gallery Talk," sharing stories behind some of the rare Presley artifacts on exhibit at the Museum. Click here for more info!


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, Event
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