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Elle King Visits Rock Hall to see Dress on Display

Tuesday, February 2: 11 a.m.
Posted by Carl Harp

Elle King Right Here Right Now Dress

Grammy-nominated artist Elle King visited the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on Friday, January 29, 2016, prior to a performance at Cleveland’s Masonic Auditorium. The “Ex’s & Oh’s” singer made the special tour stop to see her dress, now on display inside the Hall of Fame’s “Right Here, Right Now” exhibit, and hang out with some fans who came out for the occasion. 

The red kimono-style dress was worn by King during a Sonic Sessions concert at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on June 5, 2015 – check out the full concert photo gallery!

“I’m really overwhelmed right now,” said King in the Rock Hall exhibit. “I’ve come here since I was a little girl, and I played here over the summer [in 2015], and me and my band got super choked up. And just walking around and seeing how the Rock Hall keeps rock ‘n’ roll alive, to see my own dress is kind of mind-blowing, and I’m super choked up over it. It’s really cool.”

“Right Here, Right Now” takes a look at the evolution of rock and roll and its impact on the next generation of artists. Visitors ...


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Brendon Urie of Panic! at the Disco talks Weezer, Springsteen, Journey, Nirvana and AP

Friday, July 24: 12:59 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Brendon Urie of Panic! At the Disco interivew APMAS Alternative Press Exhibit Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Cleveland, Ohio

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: Tell us about some of the artists, bands who really influenced you…

Brendon Urie: Weezer… huge influence on me. I learned to play drums to the blue album [Weezer]. When I got that… I took it from my sister; I just had the cassette, and I remember just popping it in my boom box (that was still a thing, kids) and… I would just put on my really shitty headphones, and just kind of try to like… I had to tape them up, just so that they didn’t move, and just playing along for six hours. I would just listen to that album constantly. So, I mean every one of those songs… I wanted to start surfing, because of [“Surf Wax America”]… I wanted to live how they were describing their songs… how Rivers was, you know… and then later I would learn like, he’s this English major, went to college for literature and stuff… just a super smart guy. So, everything he’s singing about is a personal experience that’s true, and that really, truly affected me and songwriting as I got older. I wanted to do that, I wanted ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Exclusive Interviews

5 Songs That Define the Sounds of the 1990s

Tuesday, November 11: 3:59 p.m.

Prodigy Firestarter music video singer 90s music

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees Tom Dowd, Berry Gordy Jr., Les Paul, Sam Phillips and Phil Spector represent a 1950s and 1960s "recordist canon," pioneers of maverick recording methodologies responsible for shaping the sound of classic rock and roll. Their work not only forms the underpinning of rock music’s sonic characteristics, but also represents an oft-imitated body of audible stylistic, genre and aesthetic recording principles. Some of their radical, experimental and at times rebellious production techniques – Paul’s "Sound on Sound," Spector’s "Wall of Sound"and Phillips’ "Slap Echo" for example, have informed a continuum of established rock production standards.

However, the 1990s also marked a significant turning point in pop and rock sound recording. At a time when computer-based digital audio workstations (an electronic tool for recording, editing and producing audio files) were fast becoming the norm, many sound recordists of the era either rejected this new direction outright or blended technological and processual precursors into unconventional and individualized working practice. Such reinventions of technological and processual modes of production mirror those of the 1950s and 1960s ‘"recordist canon."

Here are 5 songs that helped define the sounds of the 1990s, and the producers who ...


continue Categories: Inductee, History of Punk, History of Rock and Roll, Event, Education, Exclusive Interviews

10 Essential Nirvana Songs

Monday, February 20: 5:30 p.m.
Posted by Ivan Sheehan

Kurt Cobain was born on February 20, 1967, in Aberdeen, Washington. The songwriter/guitarist emerged from the nascent grunge movement of the early 80s – an alternative sub genre that incorporated elements of indie, punk, hardcore and heavy metal – to become the reluctant "voice of a generation."

Nirvana Pier 48 1993 Live and Loud MTV concert

As the frontman for Nirvana, Cobain's esoteric lyrics and ability to craft indelible hooks with a uniquely metallic resonance fueled the band. Backed by the core of Krist Novoselic's steady bass and the thundering percussion of Dave Grohl, Cobain's songs almost single-handedly changed not only the musical landscape of the 1990s, but also the cultural landscape.

Nirvana led a charge that unseated the hedonistic values, flamboyant acts and slick production of hair metal at the top of the rock throne and replaced it with less scripted, more dynamic arrangements, introspective lyrics and more universally identifiable, laid-back style – including a flannel-clad fashion prerogative that was soon adopted from coast to coast, seen everywhere from dive bars to haute couture. Riding on the strength of the anthemic "Smells Like Teen Spirit," Nevermind ousted Michael Jackson's Dangerous at the top of the charts. One studio album, In Utero, followed before Cobain was found ...


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